Home » The Trade: Bristol and the Transatlantic Slave Trade by Victoria Coules
The Trade: Bristol and the Transatlantic Slave Trade Victoria Coules

The Trade: Bristol and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

Victoria Coules

Published March 1st 2007
ISBN : 9781841585321
Paperback
240 pages
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 About the Book 

Two hundred years ago, on March 25, 1807, the Slave Trade Act was passed and the kidnapping, trafficking and sale of black Africans as slaves became illegal throughout the British Empire. The Slave Trade Act was the result of a long campaign foughtMoreTwo hundred years ago, on March 25, 1807, the Slave Trade Act was passed and the kidnapping, trafficking and sale of black Africans as slaves became illegal throughout the British Empire. The Slave Trade Act was the result of a long campaign fought against bitter resistance, to bring to an end four hundred years of profit for a few and hell for many. To Western historians, it was known as the triangular trade, or Atlantic trade. To Africans it has become known as Maafa, the Kiswahili word for holocaust or great disaster. To those who profited from dealing in human flesh, it was known simply as the Trade. At its height, the Trade was a highly organized international commercial venture that had the potential to generate vast profit. There were risks, but at its peak, the trade made Bristol the second most important port in the country and its subsequent wealth was derived from the proceeds of the Atlantic slave trade. Bristols lucrative sugar and tobacco industries were fuelled by the Trade, making an already wealthy city even wealthier. Many of the great and good of Bristol were involved, and money from this enterprise paid for the University, many of the great Clifton buildings and Bristols almshouses and schools. The story of Bristols involvement in the Trade provides an original insight into the way port cities around Britain profited from the Maafa and the citys role is explored within the context of the global origins of the Trade, as well as its subsequent demise.