Home » The Army Under Pope (Campaigns of the Civil War (Book Sales)) by John Codman Ropes
The Army Under Pope (Campaigns of the Civil War (Book Sales)) John Codman Ropes

The Army Under Pope (Campaigns of the Civil War (Book Sales))

John Codman Ropes

Published September 1st 2002
ISBN : 9780785815761
Paperback
252 pages
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 About the Book 

General Books publication date: 2009 Original publication date: 1881 Original Publisher: C. Scribners Sons Description: Table of authorities and abbreviations: p. xi-xii. Subjects: United States Notes: This is a black and white OCR reprint of theMoreGeneral Books publication date: 2009 Original publication date: 1881 Original Publisher: C. Scribners Sons Description: Table of authorities and abbreviations: p. xi-xii. Subjects: United States Notes: This is a black and white OCR reprint of the original. It has no illustrations and there may be typos or missing text. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. Excerpt: CHAPTER m. ON THE RAPPAHANNOCK. Although General Pope had with him the strong division of Eicketts, and the two divisions of Sigel, besides the five thousand and odd men of Banks corps, in all, say twenty-three thousand to twenty-five thousand men, besides cavalry, he very sensibly sent to Fredericksburg for Kings division of McDowells corps, which joined him on the evening of the llth. Meanwhile, he sent a flag of truce to Jackson to bury the dead, and the whole day of the llth was passed in this sad duty. On the night of the llth, Jackson, fearing to be outnumbered, retreated to the Eapidan, followed at once by General Pope, and on the 12th our pickets watched the Eapidan from Eaccoon Ford to the base of the Blue Eidge. On the 14th, two excellent divisions of General Burnsides corps, those of Eeno and Stevens, arrived under command of the former officer, from North Carolina. They numbered together some eight thousand men. They had come by way of Aquia Creek, Falmouth, and the north bank of the Eap- pahannock. These officers were both men of noted bravery, energy, and capacity. Thus far, it will be observed, General Pope had performed the mission with which he had been entrusted. He had substituted his single will for the different wishes of three department commanders. He had concentrated a forcewhich had been widely and uselessly scattered. He had menaced the enemys communications so seriously that, before a. single regiment of the Army of the Potomac had left Ha...