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Regulating Aged Care: Ritualism and the New Pyramid John Braithwaite

Regulating Aged Care: Ritualism and the New Pyramid

John Braithwaite

Published January 1st 2007
ISBN : 9781847200013
Hardcover
372 pages
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 About the Book 

`They have given us a fascinating case study here, rich in detail, and masterfully interpreted against the backdrop of evolving regulatory strategy. It is rare indeed to find this depth of analysis made accessible, laced throughout with humanity,More `They have given us a fascinating case study here, rich in detail, and masterfully interpreted against the backdrop of evolving regulatory strategy. It is rare indeed to find this depth of analysis made accessible, laced throughout with humanity, compassion, and humor.- Malcolm Sparrow, Harvard University, US`This book offers an intelligent and insightful account of the development of nursing home regulation in three countries - England, the USA and Australia. But, more than that, it intertwines theory and more than a decade of empirical work to provide a telling and sophisticated explanation of why and how good regulatory intentions often go awry, and what can be done to create systems of regulation which really work to produce improvement.- Kieran Walshe, University of Manchester, UKThis book is a major new contribution to regulatory theory from three members of the world-class regulatory research group based in Australia. It marks a new development in responsive regulatory theory in which a strengths-based pyramid complements the regulatory pyramid.The authors compare the accomplishments of nursing home regulation in the US, the UK and Australia during the last 20 years and in a longer historical perspective. They find that gaming and ritualism, rather than defiance of regulators, are the greatest challenges for improving safety and quality of life for the elderly in care homes. Regulating Aged Care shows how good regulation and caring professionalism can transcend ritualism. Better regulation is found to be as much about encouragement to expand strengths as incentives to fix problems. The book is underpinned by one of the most ambitious, sustained qualitative and quantitative data collections in both the regulatory literature and the aged care literature. This study provides an impressive evidence base for both theory development and reassessment of policy and practitioner responses in the field.The book will find its readership amongst regulatory scholars in political science, law, socio-legal studies, sociology, economics and public policy. Gerontology and health care scholars and professionals will also find much to reflect upon in the book.