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Chukchee Mythology Waldemar Bogoras

Chukchee Mythology

Waldemar Bogoras

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228 pages
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Product DescriptionVladimir Germanovich Bogoraz (1865-1936), best known under the literary pseudonym N. A. Tan, was a Russian revolutionary, writer and anthropologist, especially known for his studies of the Chukchi people in Siberia. He publishedMoreProduct DescriptionVladimir Germanovich Bogoraz (1865-1936), best known under the literary pseudonym N. A. Tan, was a Russian revolutionary, writer and anthropologist, especially known for his studies of the Chukchi people in Siberia. He published his first literary works in the early 1880s, but he became famous in 1896-1897 under the literary pseudonym Tan for poems and novels published in various periodicals. In 1899, he published the book Chukchi Tales and in 1900, The Verses. The materials, published by Tan-Bogoraz in periodicals of the Russian Academy of Sciences, such as Specimens of Materials for Studying Chukchi Language and Folklore and Studies of Chukchi Language and Folklore Collected in Kolyma District were a very valuable contribution to the development of linguistics and made the author popular around the world. He fled Russia for political reasons in 1901 and settled in New York City, where he became curator of the American Museum, and produced his great works The Chukchee (1904-09) and Chukchee Mythology (1910). During the 1920s and 30s he did important anthropological work creating and teaching written languages for indigenous Siberian peoples and founded the Institute of the Northern Peoples in Leningrad.About the AuthorAbout the Author:Waldemar Bogoras was born in Russia in 1865, and he died in 1936. During his life he was at one time exiled into Siberia for being a populist revolutionary. This is where his ethnological research started and this is where he would return to, on more than one occasion. In Siberia he studied the Chuck chi people mostly, he also studied the Koryak, and Yupik people. He collected items from people he called Russified Natives, who had been exiled. He used these to show how cultures were being borrowed and assimilated, because they were being introduced with each other for the first time when these people were exiled. After the Russian Revolution, he became the director of the Institute of the Peoples of the North, an agency concerned with education and developmental work among the northern tribes of Siberia. He also published books and novels.